How to escape Google’s forced logins on Chrome 69




According to security researcher S. Bálint, any time someone using Chrome 69 logs into a Google service or site, they are also logged into Chrome-as-a-browser with that user account. Essentially, Google is forcefully logging users into Chrome. Chrome browser’s privacy policy notes that if you are is not signed in, all the information is locally stored on your system. However, all the data – including your browser history and password autofill information –is sent to Google servers once you’re signed in. That leads users to believe that Chrome 69’s forced login policy is sharing user data with Google.   The…

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How a coding error made 293 Subaru SUVs unusable




A software error has caused Subaru to completely dispose of 293 of its Ascent 2019 SUVs. According to a safety recall report filed with National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), robots at missed critical welds, thanks to improper coding. The robots missed welds on the cars’ B-pillars which holds the hinges to the second row doors. This gaff reduced the cars’ body strength, and could lead to passengers being injured in a crash. The company said that there is no physical remedy available to fix these cars, and as such, all of them will be destroyed instead of being refurbished. It added that…

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Let’s face it, users should never be the last line of defense in cybersecurity




It’s been obvious for a while now that the security industry is turning in circles. Users have walked a very insecure tightrope for decades, clicking on links, opening attachments, and downloading unchecked files without a safety net in place. I always find it sad when organizations are surprised that the bad guys found a way to trick an employee into clicking something malicious even though that employee has successfully completed a security awareness seminar. In a survey last year, my team and I found that 99 percent of CISOs see users as the last line of defense against the bad…

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Hollywood did a surprisingly good job predicting our drone future




Astrology, tea leaf-reading, crystal balls, and the movies. Quick quiz: Which of these four would be prognosticators has accurately predicted our tech future? If you answered “movies,” consider yourself worthy of an Oscar. When it comes to predicting the future, Hollywood has turned out to be a far more accurate seer than your local crystal ball-gazing psychic. Robots, artificial intelligence, space travel, genetic engineering – even smartwatches. They’re all there in the movies and TV shows – some of them decades old – that baby boomers and Gen X’ers grew up with. Among the future inventions that have loomed large…

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We shouldn’t market to people’s past — we need real-time, location-based strategies




When sports analytics folks crunch the numbers behind professional athlete’s batting, pitching, throwing and dunking, they are looking at past performance to better predict future behavior. Marketers and developers do the same for you and me but therein lies a problem (and a tremendous opportunity). Professional athletes are paid to do the same things well, repeatedly. You and I (assuming LeBron James is not reading) have interests, passions, hobbies, etc. that are ever-changing. Solely focusing on what we liked last month doesn’t predict 100 percent what we’ll be into today. Connecting to the kinetic While we wholly accept that data…

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‘Free tech’ economy creates harmful monopolies and alters our self-expression




When Adam Smith, champion of capitalism, wrote The Wealth of Nations in 1776, he could not have foreseen that someday many of the world’s biggest companies would be giving away their services for free. But that’s exactly what’s happening in today’s digital economy. Costs are rapidly approaching zero across a wide range of services as we drift further from a society focused on money and traditional economics to a digital-heavy culture that demands free apps and 24/7 access to information. In lieu of dollars or euros, companies are bargaining for people’s attention — and data. A new economic paradigm This…

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The crypto fatigue is real




I’ll admit it, this prolonged cryptocurrency bear market that we’re in has got me feeling down. A year ago I was enormously bullish on everything blockchain and cryptocurrency, and I still am, but 2018 has given me a mild distaste for the whole space. The market’s continuous, slow bleed throughout the year definitely has to take some blame for that, but I believe it’s mostly due to following the space closely. I can’t help noticing all the growing pains that this industry is currently going through, and it’s difficult not to take everything in. Bad actors everywhere I’m tired of…

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How your media buying agency is screwing you over




First things first. Since your digital media buying agency charges you a percentage of the ad buy spend, they have no intention of saving you money. That’s just the way it is. As a result, campaigns which could’ve achieved their objectives by spending $100,000 will end up spending $200,000. Because if they spend 100K, they get 10K. If they spend 200K, they get 20K. It’s as simple as that. If you want to know more about the bundle of lies they’re feeding you and the subtle ways you are being deceived, please read on. The bundle of lies As expected,…

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